Does Visiting Entertainment Talk Shows Make Any Sense for Politicians?

Does Visiting Entertainment Talk Shows Make Any Sense for Politicians?

Less than ten days remain and the polls are over. Too bad for us scholars in this political spectacle, but hopefully a relief to those who don’t find all that fascinating. After all, you’ve come across politicians all over the place, even when you don’t anticipate it. Visiting talk shows has become a regular weapon in the political campaign toolbox. The concern, however, is what impact this has on the reputation of particular politicians as well as on the trust of politicians more generally.

Talk shows and presentations by politicians

To answer this question, we must first look at the content of such programs. Not surprisingly, the interviewers in entertainment talk shows are much less critical of their guests than the interviewers in journalistic programs.

The reason for this is twofold are:

  • the goal that the producers have in mind
  • the topics that a program normally focuses on.

To begin with the first talk show, hosts of mostly television shows want to amuse their viewers. While some suspense is often exciting, the feel-good content of these shows is paramount. The result is that-compared to interviews in journalistic programs-politicians are addressed in a more polite and constructive manner, are often less distracted, and instead are allowed to continue chatting with sounds like “umm,” “real?” or “yeah, I understand.” “But interviews with reporters are in most cases characterized by a sensitive questioning style which is often described as a ceremonial sword combat”

In addition, the issues discussed in such interventions are essential for the understanding of the effect. Interviews of news and current affairs programming tend to concentrate on political ideas or controversies, and politicians are dismissive of their previous work or aspirations for the future. Yet celebrity chat shows present a totally different side of politicians.

Watch “Using your voice is a political choice”

https://youtu.be/zaZBgqfEa1E

Talk shows and the effects on public opinion

The concern is whether the time and resources that lawmakers bring into talk shows will pay off with extra votes. This has been investigated in the context of the US and Japanese elections. In the 2000 elections of Bush and Gore, these presidential candidates were repeatedly portrayed on talk shows such as Oprah Winfrey’s. Survey analysis suggests that viewing chat shows may have an impact on how nice people find politicians, but it also increases the chance of voting for them. People who identify with the Democratic Party were more likely to vote for Bush if they were to see these shows more frequently, while Republicans were more sympathetic and more likely to vote for Gore. Talk shows were therefore able to narrow the partisan divide in that election and persuade the voters to change parties. An significant nuance, though, is that only voters with very little political experience and participation have been affected. The opportunity to vote for a politician from the other side did not improve for people who were more politically active.

  1. Presentation of politicians in entertainment chat shows is much more constructive than in journalistic programmers. This could lead to more elections on the lawmakers who take the trouble to participate in those programs. There are, however, a host of remarks to be made: These favorable results are observed only for individuals with very little political experience.
  2.  Positive results have only been reached if the entertaining message often contains political components.
  3.  It can also contribute to political distrust among people with great political knowledge.

Talk Shows are like ‘iptv’, intended to resolve problems or raise consciousness, provide data or entertain people.

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