Tuesday, 13 October 2015

Saudi Arabia Demands That Completely Different Country Censor 'Satanic Verses'

Illegal Iranian copy of Salman Rushdie's Satanic Verses.
It's been awhile since the announcement that Saudi Arabia will be (be)heading the UN Human Rights Panel, as well as the Saudi Foreign Minister casually informing the UN that his country will reserve the right to disregard any laws giving equal rights to LGBT people - because religion. What else does the Kingdom of Saud have to contribute to the world?

Well, it turns out they're now protesting the printing of books they don't like in other countries - because, naturally, religion.
Saudi Arabia summoned the Czech ambassador to protest against a new translation of Salman Rushdie's book "Satanic Verses", Saudi state media said on Friday, 27 years after the novel triggered mass demonstrations and a death threat against the author.

The kingdom told the ambassador the book insulted both Islam and Muslims and asked him to try and halt its publication, the SPA agency added, citing a source in the Saudi foreign ministry.
Look, the Saudi government would like other countries to get their priorities straight. All these other countries do - along with pesky groups like PEN or Amnesty International - is nag nag nag them about how they jailed bloggers like Raif Badawi and torture him and flog him. Then these other countries whine and moan about how the Kingdom is beheading people at breakneck pace for really important things like being atheist, or being a witch, or saying the wrong thing... or whatever.

So tired of being bothered for trivialities like jailing and torturing people for saying the wrong thing that the Saudis even wrote a letter back to the Quebec government.
While the Kingdom regrets these media outlets' attack against the Kingdom and its Judiciary, it emphasizes that it does not accept any form of interference in its internal affairs, and rejects the encroachment on its sovereign right...
For the Saudi government, though, jailing a guy for having a liberal blog, flogging him and keeping him locked up for it appears to be a minor thing. However, internal affairs of the Czech republic be damned if they're going to publish something that upsets their religious sensibilities.

Surprisingly, (given how much money Saudi Arabia seems to throw around),  the Czech foreign minister apparently came up with some silly excuse about freedom of the press and expression.
But Czech Foreign Minister Lubomir Zaoralek told his country's CTK news agency: "We have no reason to interfere in any way because we have freedom of the press and expression." The first Czech translation of the novel appeared in 1994. Prague's Paseka publishing house issued the latest version.
Well, that's likely to go right over the heads of the Saudi officials.

I wonder which sovereign independent country they will protest for next? Do you think they'll begin requesting that foreign authors be jailed and flogged on their own soil according to Sharia Law?

(Image source)

No comments:

Post a Comment

Search This Blog